** Progress in Earth and Planetary Science is the official journal of the Japan Geoscience Union, published in collaboration with its 50 society members.

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    • Progress in Earth and Planetary Science
    • Progress in Earth and Planetary Science
    • Progress in Earth and Planetary Science
    • Progress in Earth and Planetary Science
    • Progress in Earth and Planetary Science
    Progress in Earth and Planetary Science

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    Solid earth sciences

    Paleo-stress orientations and magnitudes from triaxial testing and stress inversion analysis in Nankai accretionary prism sediments

    Hashimoto Y, Stipp M, Lewis J, Wuttke F

    Paleo-stress state, Paleo-stress magnitude, Nankai accretionary wedge, NanTroSEIZE

    Combined knowledge on the magnitude as well as the orientation of paleo-stress is usually not given. Based on drilling investigations and laboratory experiments, we are able to provide both, constraints on paleo-stress magnitude as well as orientation in the shallow part of the Nankai accretionary wedge at Sites C0001 and C0002 of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Nankai Trough Seismogenic Zone Experiment (NanTroSEIZE). Slip data of core-scale faults indicate multiple paleo-stress geometries, including normal, strike-slip, and reverse faulting regimes. Combining new and previously obtained results from triaxial compressional tests that constrain internal friction angles at critical state with the paleo-stress inversion results, we examine paleo-stress magnitudes for each stress state at each site. We observe that the paleo-stress magnitude for the normal faulting regime is smaller than that for the reverse faulting regime, although the paleo-stress magnitude for Site C0002 is not well-constrained. The change in stress magnitude may reflect changing horizontal tectonic stresses transmitted to the accretionary wedge from changing friction conditions along the subduction plate interface and in turn may have implications for the evolution of the accretionary wedge and/or the seismic cycle.