Progress in Earth and Planetary Science

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    The abbreviated journal title to be used when an article in PEPS is cited:

    Prog Earth Planet Sci

    ** Progress in Earth and Planetary Science is the official journal of the Japan Geoscience Union, published in collaboration with its 51 society members.

    ** Progress in Earth and Planetary Science is partly financially supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Publication of Scientific Research Results to enhance dissemination of information of scientific research.

    >>Japan Geoscience Union

    >>Links to 51 society members

    • Progress in Earth and Planetary Science
    • Progress in Earth and Planetary Science
    • Progress in Earth and Planetary Science
    • Progress in Earth and Planetary Science
    • Progress in Earth and Planetary Science
    Progress in Earth and Planetary Science

    Impact Factor 3.9

    5-Year Impact Factor 4.1

    CiteScore 7.0

    PEPS COVER

    What is Progress in Earth and Planetary Science (PEPS)?

    • Full open access peer-review e-journal
    • Official journal of the Japan Geoscience Union, published in collaboration with its 51 society members
    • Covering all fields of Earth and Planetary Science

    Latest Articles

    What is Progress in Earth and Planetary Science (PEPS)?

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    SPecial call for Excellent Papers on hot topicS

    New!

    20. Biogeochemical Studies on Atmosphere, Ocean, and their Interaction in the western North Pacific region

    Schedule

    Submission start: February 19, 2024

    Submission deadline: October 31, 2024

    Submit

    detail

    Proponents:

    Fumikazu Taketani, JAMSTEC, Japan

    Kana Nagashima, JAMSTEC, Japan

    Koji Sugie, JAMSTEC, Japan

    Editorial task team

    Fumikazu Taketani, JAMSTEC, Japan

    Jun Nishioka, Hokkaido University, Japan

    Tung-Yuan Ho, Academia Sinica, Taiwan

    Yuko Omori, Tsukuba University, Japan

    Kana Nagashima, JAMSTEC, Japan

    Koji Sugie, JAMSTEC, Japan

    Guo Cui, Ocean University of China, China

    The western North Pacific is recognized as a large sink region for CO2, involving complex interactions across multiple spheres in the cycling process. Recent rapid climate changes have perturbed the biogeochemical and physical processes in the atmosphere and ocean of this region. To enhance our understanding of these processes in this region, integrated and cross-cutting studies are essential, encompassing the Atmosphere, Hydrosphere, Biosphere, and Humanosphere across various temporal and spatial scales.

    In this special issue SPEPS, we invite authors to contribute their latest studies and/or reviews focusing on Atmosphere, Ocean, and Atmosphere-Ocean Interaction in the western North Pacific region. We particularly welcome multidisciplinary studies that couple chemical, biological, and/or physical topics related to the atmosphere and ocean, obtained from ship-based observation, numerical model calculations, satellite data analysis, and laboratory experiments. Discussions centered on ground-based observation surrounding the western North Pacific are also welcomed.

    New!

    19. Progress on science and instruments for Martian Moons eXploration (MMX) mission

    Schedule

    Submission start: August 15, 2023

    Submission deadline: October 31, 2024

    Submit

    detail

    Proponents:

    Kiyoshi Kuramoto, Hokkaido University, Japan, MMX project scientist

    Hidenori Genda , Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan, MMX science board member

    Editorial task team

    Hidenori Genda, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan

    Tomohiro USUI, JAXA, Japan

    Nancy L CHABOT, The Johns Hopkins University, USA

    Martian Moons eXploration (MMX) mission is the third sample return mission led by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) with international collaborations following Hayabusa and Hayabusa 2 missions. The MMX spacecraft is planned to be launched in September 2024, extensively observe Mars and its two moons Phobos and Deimos over 3 years, and collect samples (> 10g) from Phobos, and return to the Earth in 2029. The major scientific objectives of MMX mission are to solve the mystery of origin of Phobos and Deimos, to elucidate the early Solar System evolution in terms of volatile delivery across the snow line to the terrestrial planets having habitable surface environments, and to explore the evolutionary processes of both moons and Mars surface environment. These scientific objectives will be achieved by extensive observations by various instruments, rover exploration on Phobos, and sample analysis. It is a good timing to call for papers about the progress on science for Mars-Martian moons system, and the final status of the instruments and rover for Martian Moons eXploration (MMX) mission.

    18. Past variability of Asian monsoon and its influence on surrounding regions on various timescales

    Schedule

    Submission start: April 1, 2023

    Submission deadline: June 30, 2024

    Submit

    detail

    Proponents:

    Takuya Sagawa, Kanazawa University, Japan

    Li Lo, National Taiwan University, Taiwan

    Chloe Anderson, Harvard University, USA

    Editorial task team

    Takuya Sagawa, Kanazawa University, Japan

    Li Lo, National Taiwan University, Taiwan

    Chloe Anderson, Harvard University, USA

    Yusuke Okazaki, Kyushu University, Japan

    The Asian monsoon is an inter-hemispheric atmospheric system driven by thermal contrast between land and ocean, involving regions where more than half of the global population lives. Concerns grow that climate change will cause extreme events linked to the Asian monsoon, such as extraordinarily heavy rainfall, flooding, drought, or heat waves. Deciphering relationships between the past and present Asian monsoon and climate variability will provide valuable insights into the mechanisms behind these extreme events and Earth's climate system.

    Variation in the Asian monsoon is both influenced by the surrounding environment and itself influences the marine environment of the Indo-Pacific and marginal seas. For instance, ocean temperatures around these regions have played important roles on Asian monsoon variability by changing the land-ocean thermal contrast. On the other hand, variability in the Asian monsoon influences the surrounding regions through water vapor circulation, riverine discharge, physical and chemical weathering, transportation of detritus and nutrients, dust emission and transport, and other environmental impacts. Therefore, paleoenvironmental reconstructions of this region are necessary to understand the many links between the Asian monsoon and terrestrial and oceanic systems.

    This special issue focuses on past change of Asian monsoon and oceanographic conditions in the Indo-Pacific region, and their relationship with the global climate change over various timescales. It addresses paleoenvironmental reconstruction of terrestrial and marine regions and interplay between them with emphasis on the Asian monsoon, the Japan Sea, and the western North Pacific during the late Cenozoic.

    17. Geophysical Properties and Transport Processes in the Deep Crust and Mantle

    Schedule

    Submission start: January 01, 2023

    Submission deadline: March 31, 2024

    Submit

    detail

    Proponents:

    Bjorn Mysen, Carnegie Institute of Washington, USA

    Editorial task team

    Eiji Ohtani, Tohoku University, Japan

    M. Satish Kumar, Niigate University, Japan

    Bjorn Mysen, Carnegie Institute of Washington, USA

    The formation and evolution of the Earth depend on transfer of mass and energy. The principal mass and energy transport agents in the Earth's interior are fluids and magmas

    The geophysical and geochemical properties of magma and fluid are controlled by their chemical composition, temperature, and pressure. The transport processes are governed by this property information. Characterization of their properties is central to our understanding of crust and mantle processes including seismicity in subduction zones.

    The transport processes of fluids and magmas are imaged globally and locally by geophysical observations such as seismic tomography and electrical conductivity profiles. These are processes imaged with geophysical methods with which a three-dimensional structure of fluid and magma plumbing systems can be described, and in the geological records of earlier phenomena. These processes, in turn, reflect the geochemistry of the materials.

    The proposed SPEPS will address results of experiments and natural observations needed to enhance our understanding of magma and fluid-mediated processes in the Earth's interior. These include physical and chemical properties and process of fluids and magmas, near surface processes of seismicity in subduction zones, volcanic eruptions as well as geophysical imaging of various scales from locally to globally.

    16. Water-carbon cycles and terrestrial changes in the Arctic and subarctic regions

    Schedule

    Submission start: November 15, 2022

    Submission deadline: February 29, 2024

    Submit

    detail

    Proponents:

    Tetsuya Hiyama, Nagoya University, Japan

    Editorial task team

    Tetsuya Hiyama, Nagoya University

    Tomonori Sato, Hokkaido University

    Kazuhito Ichii, Chiba University

    Hotaek Park, JAMSTEC

    David Gustafsson, SMHI

    *Yoshihiro Iijima, Mie University

    (*) Section Chief Editor, PEPS

    Global warming accelerates Arctic sea ice retreat, which feeds back to significant changes in atmospheric-terrestrial water cycle in the Arctic and subarctic regions. These large-scale environmental changes alter the condition of surface water and vegetation, affecting spatiotemporal variations in greenhouse gases budget. To better understand water–carbon cycles in these regions, integrated studies on atmospheric–terrestrial water–carbon cycles are required.

    In this special issue SPEPS, we thus invite authors to contribute latest researches or reviews focusing on atmospheric–terrestrial water and carbon cycles in the Arctic and subarctic regions. Studies aiming to reveal spatiotemporal variations in the atmospheric moisture transport, moisture flux convergence, precipitation, vegetation, permafrost degradation, greenhouse gas fluxes, and the Arctic river discharges and their impacts on peripheral seas are highly welcomed, including the future projections. Additionally, interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary researches in cross-cutting with sociological studies are also welcomed.