** Progress in Earth and Planetary Science is the official journal of the Japan Geoscience Union, published in collaboration with its 50 society members.

    ** Progress in Earth and Planetary Science is partly financially supported by KAKENHI, a Grant-in-Aid from Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (Grant Number: 254001), for Publication of Scientific Research Results to enhance dissemination of information of scientific research.

    >>Japan Geoscience Union

    >>Links to 50 society members

    • Progress in Earth and Planetary Science
    • Progress in Earth and Planetary Science
    • Progress in Earth and Planetary Science
    • Progress in Earth and Planetary Science
    • Progress in Earth and Planetary Science
    Progress in Earth and Planetary Science

    Gallery View of PEPS Articles

    Research

    Atmospheric and hydrospheric sciences

    Regional moisture budget associated with drought/flood events over China

    Qiu S, Zhou W, Leung M YT, Li X

    Water vapor budget, Drought and flood events, Enso, Standardized Precipitation Index

    Climatology of summer time mean moisture budget in 6 sub-regions in China (1961–2000)

    In this study, long-term (1961–2011) variations in the moisture budget and drought/flood events in six subregions of China are analyzed. Water vapor is mainly transported zonally during winter, while meridional transport is much stronger during summer. During winter, both the input moisture from the western boundary and the output moisture from the eastern boundary are slightly weakened; thus, the total amount of regional moisture in these subregions does not change much in eastern China. During summer, the decline in input moisture from the south is slightly weaker than the decrease in output moisture via the northern boundary; therefore, the net moisture budget is slightly increased in eastern China, resulting in more flood events during recent decades in this region. Generally, China tends to suffer much less drought risk and higher flood risk in the mature winter and decaying summer of El Niño; the opposite impact appears during a La Niña event, but with lower intensity.